Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

An Ancient Healing Plant: Yarrow, or Achillea millefolium


  • Please log in to reply
No replies to this topic

#1 Scáthach

Scáthach

    Filí na Reabhlóide

  • Administrators
  • 556 posts

Posted 08 September 2015 - 08:29 PM

Achillea millefolium, known commonly as yarrow /ˈjær/ or common yarrow, is a flowering plant in the family Asteraceae. It is native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere in Asia, Europe, and North America.[1]

 

yarrow02-l.jpg

 

The herb is purported to be a diaphoretic, astringent,[34]tonic,[34]stimulant and mild aromatic. It contains isovaleric acid, salicylic acid, asparagin, sterols, flavonoids, bitters, tannins, and coumarins. The plant also has a long history as a powerful 'healing herb' used topically for wounds, cuts and abrasions. The genus name Achillea is derived from mythical Greek character, Achilles,[34] who reportedly carried it with his army to treat battle wounds. This medicinal action is also reflected in some of the common names mentioned below, such as staunchweed and soldier's woundwort.[1]

 

 

The leaves encourage clotting, so it can be used fresh for nosebleeds.[38] The aerial parts of the plant are used for phlegm conditions, as a bitter digestive tonic to encourage bile flow, and as a diuretic.[39] The aerial parts act as a tonic for the blood, stimulate the circulation, and can be used for high blood pressure; it is also useful in menstrual disorders, and as an effective sweating remedy to bring down fevers.[1]

 

Yarrow intensifies the medicinal action of other herbs taken with it.[40] It is reported[41] to be associated with the treatment of the following ailments:

 

Pain,[42] antiphlogistic,[43][44]bleeding, gastrointestinal disorders,[43] choleretic[45] inflammation,[46] emmenagogue,[47] stomachache.[48]

 

Chinese proverbs claim yarrow brightens the eyes and promotes intelligence. Yarrow and tortoiseshell are considered to be lucky in Chinese tradition.[49]

 

In classical Greece, Homer tells of the centaur Chiron, who conveyed herbal secrets to his human pupils, and taught Achilles to use yarrow on the battle grounds of Troy.[50]

 

Yarrow, Achillea millefolium and its North American varieties, was used in traditional Native American herbal medicine by tribes across the continent.[53] The Navajo considered it to be a "life medicine", chewed it for toothaches, and poured an infusion into ears for earaches. The Miwok in California used the plant as an analgesic and head cold remedy.[53]

 

 

Several cavity-nesting birds, including the common starling, use yarrow to line their nests. Experiments conducted on the tree swallow, which does not use yarrow, suggest that adding yarrow to nests inhibits the growth of parasites.[58]

 

 

https://en.wikipedia...lea_millefolium


  • Fodla32 likes this

πάθει μάθος - Αἰσχύλος