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Workers' Songs

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Guest Connolly

Good song apart from the "police man on patrol" and the bit about America. I heard it on RnG earlier.

 

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The Red Flag

Written by Irish Socialist Republican and I.R.B Member Jim Connell.

 

The people's flag is deepest red,

It shrouded oft our martyred dead,

And ere their limbs grew stiff and cold,

Their hearts' blood dyed its ev'ry fold.

 

Then raise the scarlet standard high.

Within its shade we'll live and die,

Though cowards flinch and traitors sneer,

We'll keep the red flag flying here.

 

Look 'round, the Frenchman loves its blaze,

The sturdy German chants its praise,

In Moscow's vaults its hymns are sung

Chicago swells the surging throng.

 

Then raise the scarlet standard high.

Within its shade we'll live and die,

Though cowards flinch and traitors sneer,

We'll keep the red flag flying here.

 

It waved above our infant might,

When all ahead seemed dark as night;

It witnessed many a deed and vow,

We must not change its colour now.

 

Then raise the scarlet standard high.

Within its shade we'll live and die,

Though cowards flinch and traitors sneer,

We'll keep the red flag flying here.

 

It well recalls the triumphs past,

It gives the hope of peace at last;

The banner bright, the symbol plain,

Of human right and human gain.

 

Then raise the scarlet standard high.

Within its shade we'll live and die,

Though cowards flinch and traitors sneer,

We'll keep the red flag flying here.

 

It suits today the weak and base,

Whose minds are fixed on pelf and place

To cringe before the rich man's frown,

And haul the sacred emblem down.

 

Then raise the scarlet standard high.

Within its shade we'll live and die,

Though cowards flinch and traitors sneer,

We'll keep the red flag flying here.

 

With heads uncovered swear we all

To bear it onward till we fall;

Come dungeons dark or gallows grim,

This song shall be our parting hymn.

 

Then raise the scarlet standard high.

Within its shade we'll live and die,

Though cowards flinch and traitors sneer,

We'll keep the red flag flying here.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ko5RVipAdrs

 

Pound a Week Rise

 

 

Come all of you colliers that work down the mine

From Scotland to South Wales, from Teesdale to Tyne

I'll sing you a song of a pound a week rise

And the men who were fooled by the Government's lies

And it's down you go, down below, Jack

Where you never see the skies

And you're working in a dingeon

For a pound a week rise

In nineteen and sixty, a few years ago

The mineworkers' leaders to Lord Robens did go

Saying, "We work very hard, every day we risk our lives

And we ask you here and now for a pound a week rise"

Then up spoke Lord Robens, and he made this decree

"When the output rises then with you I will agree

To raise up all your wages, to give to you fair pay

For I was once a miner and I worked hard in my day"

So the miners they went home, they worked hard and well

With lungs full of coaldust in the bosom of hell

The output rose by sixteen, eighteen per cent and more

And when two years had passed and gone it rose above a score

Then the miners they went to get their hard-won prize

To ask Lord Robens for their pound a week rise

Robens wouldn't give a pound, he wouldn't give ten bob

He gave them seven-and-six and said, "Get back to your job"

So come all of you colliers, take heed what I say

And don't believe Lord Robens when he says he'll give fair pay

For he'll tell you to work hard, to make the output rise

You'll get Pie in the Sky instead of a one pound rise.

 

 

Lord Robens

 

Alfred_Robbens2.jpg

 

Just some of the sh!t this b@stArd got up to.

Aberfan Disaster

 

The largest single blow to his reputation came from his reaction to the catastrophic 1966 industrial accident at Aberfan. On the morning of 21 October a massive spoil heap from the nearby Merthyr Vale Colliery collapsed onto the village of Aberfan, burying 20 houses and the Pantglas Junior School in a 10-metre deep landslide of water-saturated slurry, killing 116 school children and 28 adults.

Despite the enormity of the disaster, Robens chose to go ahead with his installation as Chancellor of the University of Surrey before coming to Aberfan, and he did not arrive until the evening of the following day,[1] a blunder that was compounded by the actions of NCB staff, who falsely informed the Minister of Power that Robens was at Aberfan. At first, Robens claimed that the disaster had been caused by "natural unknown springs" beneath the tip, but evidence emerged that the existence of these springs was common knowledge.

The report of the Davies Tribunal which inquired into the disaster was highly critical of the NCB and Robens. He controversially appeared in the final days of the inquiry and conceded that the NCB was at fault, an admission which would have rendered much of the inquiry unnecessary had it been made at the outset.[3] After the report was published in August 1967 he wrote to the then Minister of Power offering his resignation, but the Minister and PM Harold Wilson rejected it, although several cabinet members argued strongly that Robens should have been removed.

There have been allegations that the resignation offer was "bogus" and Robens had been assured that it would not be accepted.[4] According to Ronald Dearing, then a senior member of staff at the Ministry of Power, who briefed Marsh on the matter, the fact that Robens was "taking the coal industry through a period of painful contraction without big strikes" and the strong support for him within the coal industry and the union movement were crucial to the decision to retain him.[5]

In the wake of the disaster Robens refused to allow the NCB to fund the removal of the remaining tips from Aberfan, despite the fact that the Davies Tribunal concluded that the NCB's liability was "incontestible and uncontested".

Despite this conclusion, Robens refused to pay the full cost. This put the Trustees of the Disaster Fund, which had been raised by public appeal, under "intolerable pressure". Robens then "raided" the Fund for £150,000 (£1.8 million at 2003 prices[6])to cover the cost of removing the tips – an action that was "unquestionably unlawful" under charity law – and the Charity Commission took no action to protect the Fund from Robens's dubious appropriation of funds.[7]

There is no evidence that prosecution for corporate manslaughter was considered at the time.[8] Robens was exonerated by the official history of the NCB[9] but he remains condemned in other quarters.

 

Well worth a read.

http://en.wikipedia....s_of_Woldingham

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