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Guest Connolly

Learning Tin Whistle, need help.

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Guest Connolly

Iv just started to try teach myself the Tin Whistle. Im learning Oro se do bheatha bhaile and have come into a little difficulty.

 

I have got as far as the bolded bit but im having trouble with this D, E, G and then A notes. They dont sound right. Also, what does the D' and E' mean? And the A---- mean. Thanks.

 

 

A A G A B A G E

G G G G G D E G

A A G A B A B D’

E’ B D’ B A--- A---

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Guest Connolly

Ok I figured most of it out except for the D E G notes. The E' and D' seem to mean blow a little harder to get a high pitched note from these? Its a harder little tune than I thought :D

 

A G A B A G E

G G G G G D E G

A A G A B A B D’

E’ B D’ B A--- A---

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This is the way I play it a chara. Note the BB in the bottom line, these notes are to be played quickly together.

 

A A G A B A G E

G G A D E G

A A G A B A B D'

B D' E' BB D' B A G A

 

The letters with an inverted comma beside them (D') means its a high note. Usually its a little cross above the note.

 

B is the 1st note, A is the 2nd note, G is the 3rd note, F is the 4th note E is the 5th note and D is the sixth note.

 

What I mean by 1,2,3,4,5,6 note, is how many fingers are covering the holes to produce the note. So if you have all holes covered, you will produce a D note, likewise if you only cover the top two holes you will produce an A note.

 

When you take all your finger off the whistle, you produce a C note, another way to do it is to cover A and G, this will also produce a C note.

 

Let me know if this helps a chara.

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Guest Connolly

Cheers for that nico.

 

Ok I think I have it now.

 

I was blowing long into the D and E notes which was stupid so it sounds ok now :)

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Guest Connolly

BTW nico what whistle letter do you use, or prefer?

 

I have a C and a D. Im using the C at the moment here as it dosnt seem to squeak as much as the other one.

 

What are the advantages of the D?

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BTW nico what whistle letter do you use, or prefer?

 

I have a C and a D. Im using the C at the moment here as it dosnt seem to squeak as much as the other one.

 

What are the advantages of the D?

 

The D scale is the most common scale out there, you can nearly play along to anything in D.

As I said, D is more commonly used but I've also heard that C was used more, back in the day, in traditional Irish music.

Nearly all beginners will start off using a D whistle, and that's what I would suggest using.

 

Switching between whistles produces varying sounds and it takes a bit of practice to get used to making the switch, just stick to the D until you have a good grasp on it. The reason its making a screech is probably because its a mass' produced whistle. These have a tendency to be out of tune.

 

Go to Waltons and pick yourself up a "Tony Dixon" whistle, they're not too expensive, and buy yourself a brass one, these are the best for practicing on. One's made from tin are more for playing live at gigs etc...

 

The whistle I prefer now is my Low F Chieftain whistle, it produces a powerful sound but as a normal whistle or higher octave, it has a much higher pitch than a D or C.

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Guest Connolly

The two I have here are brass. One has waltons on it and the other feadog. Ill have to check those ones you mention out. Will I start banging out tunes the way you do if I get one or does that take practice? :D

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The two I have here are brass. One has waltons on it and the other feadog. Ill have to check those ones you mention out. Will I start banging out tunes the way you do if I get one or does that take practice? :D

 

Waltons are crap! but Feadog are usually good, what one is causing you problems?

Also, it will take a lot more than buying a few whistles before you're banging out tunes like me, plenty of practice! :D

 

After ten years of more, I'm still learning myself, there's always something new you will pick up along the way, and as they say, practice makes perfect!

Keep at it a chara :hammersickle:

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Guest Connolly

Waltons are crap! but Feadog are usually good, what one is causing you problems?

Also, it will take a lot more than buying a few whistles before you're banging out tunes like me, plenty of practice! :D

 

After ten years of more, I'm still learning myself, there's always something new you will pick up along the way, and as they say, practice makes perfect!

Keep at it a chara :hammersickle:

 

Your right! Its the Walton one thats squeaking. Its a D. The C is the feadog and thats why ive been using it instead. Less squeak.

 

Also, would I get a better sound out of a low D as a starter whistle\?

 

And why do they use the tin ones for gigs?

 

Apologies for all these questions nico :P

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Your right! Its the Walton one thats squeaking. Its a D. The C is the feadog and thats why ive been using it instead. Less squeak.

 

Also, would I get a better sound out of a low D as a starter whistle\?

 

And why do they use the tin ones for gigs?

 

Apologies for all these questions nico :P

 

A low D is very difficult to play and takes a while to master it, just stick to the small one for now.

 

Whistles made from tin keep their sound unlike one's made from brass. The sound of a brass whistle can change depending on if it is hot our cold. They are subtle differences but they make all the difference.

 

That's why tin whistles are the more commonly used whistle when playing at gigs, you're always guaranteed that it will produce the same sound regardless if it is hot or cold.

 

Brass whistles give off a more softer sound as well and are better for just practicing with than tin whistles. You'll notice the differences as you progress.

 

Also, keep asking away a chara! I'm more than happy to help out in any way I can!

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Guest Connolly

I can play Oro Se off by heart now.

 

At the moment im trying to learn A Las Barricadas. I got this from a youtube video:

 

 

LA LA SOL FA FA MI RE RE DO RE FA

MI LA LA LA SOL FA MI RE MI FA SOL LA

LA LA LA RE* LA SOL FA FA MI RE FA

MI LA LA LA SOL FA MI RE FA MI RE DO

FA FA FA DO FA SOL SOL SOL DO SOL

SOL DO SOL SIb LA SOL LA LA LA LA

LA LA LA RE LA SOL FA FA MI RE FA

MI LA LA LA SOL FA MI RE FA MI RE DO

FA FA FA DO FA SOL SOL SOL DO SOL

SOL DO SOL SIb LA SOL LA LA LA LA

LA LA LA LA RE LA SOL FA FA FA MI RE FA

MI LA LA LA SOL FA MI RE FA MI RE.

 

And iv been trying to convert it into the sort of note format I used above.

 

I have it as

 

 

B B A G G F E E D E G

F B B B A G F E F G A B

B B B E' B A G G F E G

F B B B B A G F E G F E D

G G G D G A A A D A

A D A E' B A B B B B

B B B E B A G G G F E G

F B B B A G F E G F E

 

BUT, im having trouble converting the note in bold. I have it as E' but it dosnt sound right!! Any idea?

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Here's the sheet music to A Las Barricadas. http://www.nationala...?num=1127565653

 

The piece of music is called Warszawianka (1905) - not to be confused with Warszawiakna (1831) (google is great!!). Its about 1/3 of the page down.

 

Its in B, so I'm not sure if it translates over to a C or D whistle easily. The starting notes are As on the music, but in that video that you posted, they sound like Bs to me. Perhaps its been coverted over to suit the whistle. It seems to me that if you just go up one note from the notes on the music that that works, almost. So, start with a B and play each note one note higher than on the sheet. Although I can't read sheet music that well (all I can remember is that the spaces spell out FACE), so I haven't been able to test this out to the end of the music.

 

Here is a slower version that is easier to pick out

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