ICL R

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ICL R last won the day on January 28 2013

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  1. A wreath-laying ceremony will take place at the Talbot Street memorial (near Connolly train station) on Friday next, 17th May 2013 at 11.30 am. Prayers will be led by Rev. Tom Clowe SDB and the annual oration will be delivered by the artist, Robert Ballagh. The anniversary Mass will be celebrated by Rev. Tom Clowe SDB in St. Francis Xavier Church, Upper Gardiner Street, Dublin at 1 pm. Justice for the Forgotten appeals to the people of Dublin to show their solidarity with the bereaved families and injured survivors by attending these commemorative ceremonies.
  2. Please forward information and attend (free and open to all). Bígí i láthair agus scaipigí eolas. Two talks On aspects of the Basque struggle are on the 6th & 7th March 2013: 1. UNCOVERING FASCIST CRIMES OF THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR: Speaker from Basque organisation Ahuaztuak working in this field. 7.30pm, Wednesday 6th March 2013, Teachers' Club, 36, Parnell Square (West), D1. Speaker from Basque organisation Ahaztuak (The Forgotten) 1936/1977. Formed in 2005, the organisation collects and publishes testimonies of victims of the fascist uprising and subsequent fascist state and other documents, organises commemorations, holds conferences, all in the teeth of the opposition of the Spanish state and of the Navarran regional government. The main work of Ahaztuak is towards achievement of their plan / proposals for peace, reparations and justice for the victims of the 1936 coup d'etat, of repression then and afterwards throughout the existence of the fascist regime. 2. Gníomhaíocht Ar Son Cearta Teanga Na mBascach / Action For Basque Language Rights: Speaker from the EHE (Basque Country Through Basque) [Euskal Herrian Euskaraz]. EHE was formed in 1979 with the aim of having their country Basque-speaking and to defend the rights of people to live their lives through the the medium of the Basque language. 7.00pm, Thursday 7th March 2013, Cassidy's Hotel, 6-8 Cavendish Row (Parnell Sq. East), D1. Cainteoir ó EHE (Tír na mBascach Trí Bhascais) mar chuid de Sheachtain Dlúpháirtíochta Idirnáisiúnta Thír na mBascach. Bunaíodh EHE i 1979 le tír labhartha Bascais a chruthú agus chun cosaint a dhéanamh ar chearta daoine chun a saol a gcaitheamh thrí mheáin an Bhascais. 7:00i.n, Déardaoin 7 Márta, Óstán Cassidy, Cearnóg Phairneil (Oir.), BÁC1. Also, Prisoners' Solidarity Picket Saturday 16th March 2013: 2pm, European Union Parliament office, Dawson St./ Molesworth St, Dublin 1. The picket is timed to be held just prior to the hearing of the appeal of the Spanish state against the judgement of the European Court of Human Rights in Strassbourg that ETA prisoner Inez del Río Prada should be released and paid €30,000 in compensation by the Spanish state and that they should pay the costs of €1,500. The Spanish state in 2006 had introduced legislation to extend the sentences of political prisoners beyond the previously-permissible maximum of 20 years. They also made it apply retrospectively to those sentenced prior to the change in legislation. The Spanish Government has challenged the unanimous ruling of the Strassbourg court panel and refused to release del Río pending the hearing of the appeal. Askapena, a Basque internationalist solidarity organisation, has called for protests to be held internationally around the date of the appeal and the Dublin Basque Irish Solidarity Committee calls for strong solidarity attendance at the this event. Please note that the DIBSC asks for no party material and will supply placards and flags. DIBSC
  3. Summary - Justice for the Forgotten and Dublin Bus will be holding a commemoration for the victims of the Dublin bombings of December 1972 and January 1973. A wreath-laying ceremony to honour and remember the three busmen who were killed will take place in Sackville Place at the site of the pavement memorial: ‘A Fallen Bouquet’. All welcome Details - The 40th anniversary of the Dublin bombings of December 1972 and January 1973 will be marked with a significant commemorative event on Tuesday, 4th December 2012 at 11.30 am. A wreath-laying ceremony to honour and remember the three busmen who were killed will take place in Sackville Place at the site of the pavement memorial: ‘A Fallen Bouquet’. The Lord Mayor of Dublin, the CEO of Dublin Bus, Justice for the Forgotten and family members will lay wreaths. The CIE Male Voice Choir and Ms Grace Bradshaw, grand-daughter of the late Tommy Duffy (killed on 1st December 1972) will provide the music. Nobody has ever been arrested, let alone convicted, of these atrocities. Everyone is very welcome to attend and show solidarity with the families, some of whom will be travelling from overseas to attend the event. Please feel free to distribute the poster widely and get the word out. I appreciate it's not the best time - a Tuesday morning - to get a large attendance, but I believe this was done to allow relatives of all the families to attend, with some travelling from Scotland and england especially for the occasion.
  4. Public Talk and launch of pamphlet on the significence of the 1913 Alternative Covenant and the role of progressive Protestantism Speakers: Rev. David Frazer and Bill O'Brien. When: Wednesday 3rd October, 7pm Where: Belvedere Hotel, Denmark Street, Dublin 1. The 28th September 2012 was the centenary of the Ulster Solemn League and Covenant against Home Rule. Far less well known is the ‘Alternative Ulster Covenant’, signed in October 1913 by some twelve thousand Protestants from County Antrim in support of Home Rule and against partition. The Counter Covenant was written by Rev JB Armour and Roger Casement. It read: "Being convinced in our conscience that Home Rule will not be disastrous to the national well-being of Ulster, and that, moreover, the responsibility of self-government would strengthen the popular forces in other provinces, would pave the way to a civil and religious freedom, which we do not now possess, and would give scope for a spirit of citizenship, we, in whose names are underwritten, Irish citizens, Protestants, and loyal supporters of Irish Nationality, relying under God on the proven good feelings and democratic instincts in our fellow-countrymen of other creeds, hereby pledge ourselves to stand by one another and our country in the troubled days that are before us and more especially to help one another when our liberties are threatened by any non-statutory body that may be set up in Ulster or elsewhere. We intend to abide by the just laws of the lawful Parliament of Ireland until such time as it may prove itself hostile to democracy. In sure confidence that God will stand by those who stand by the people, irrespective of class or creed, we hereunto subscribe our names.” Whilst the numbers who signed the Alternative Covenant do pale in comparison with the numbers who signed Carson’s Covenant, its very existence does call into question the myth of a Protestant Ulster undivided in its loyalty to the Crown and as one in its opposition to Irish nationalism and self-determination. A historical pamphlet discussing not only the Alternative Covenant but also what James Connolly predicted would be a ‘carnival of reaction’, north and south. All Welcome Some Background - The Alternative Ulster Covenant On the 24th of October 1913, a public meeting titled ‘Protestants against Carsonism’ was held in Ballymoney Town Hall, Co. Antrim. The meeting was called by Rev J. B. Armour, minister of the local Trinity Presbyterian Church and a liberal Home Ruler. Armour was an outspoken critic of the politics of Edward Carson, his Ulster Volunteer Force and the 1912 Ulster Covenant. The town of Ballymoney was chosen as the meeting place because the district had a radical Republican tradition going back to the United Irishmen in the 1790s. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries it was also the hotbed of tenant rights agitation among the Protestant tenant farmer population. Over five hundred people attended the meeting, which overflowed from the hall onto the street outside. Mottos on the walls proclaimed ‘Ulster for Ireland and Ireland for Ulster’. Those attending included representatives of all social classes. Rev. Armour wanted to demonstrate the level of strong opposition to partition and sectarian politics that existed among Irish Protestants; for this reason the meeting was a Protestant one and Catholics were specifically asked not to attend. Two resolutions were passed. The first resolution rejected the claim of Carson to speak for Ulster’s Protestants and it pledged its signatories to lawful resistance to Carson’s activities. The second resolution was put before the meeting by Roger Casement. A British consul from Ballymena, Casement had gained international acclaim for his exposure of the exploitation of native peoples in the Congo and the Putumayo River region in Peru. Casement’s resolution read: “That this meeting dispute the narrow claim that differences of creed necessarily separate Irishmen and women into hostile camps, affirms its belief that joint public service is the best means of allaying dissensions and promoting patriotism, and calls upon his Majesty's Government to pursue the policy of bringing all Irish men together in one common field of national effort.” This resolution was passed unanimously. Various contributions from the floor expressed anger at the thought of the division of Ulster and the exclusion of three of her nine counties. It was argued that if they accepted Home Rule, Irish Protestants would have at least one quarter of the membership of any Dublin parliament to protect them and to look after their interests. Partition, however, would bring about two sectarian states, where the major denomination in each would have too much power and would dominate religious minorities. Religious division rather than cooperation would become the order of the day. Others at the meeting suggested that partition would have a severe negative impact on the economy of Ulster and of Ireland as a whole. Further industrialisation would become difficult and Ulster’s natural farming communities would be divided from each other. Casement remarked: ‘I have no wish to add to the tensions of the day. I am seeking only to point a way, not to conflict and further embitterment of feeling, but to a peace with honour; a peace for Ireland as a whole and honour for Ulster as the first province of Ireland.’ He went on: ‘Ulstermen have been sold by political trickery, arming and drilling against the perceived enemy. The enemy they are been led against, is no enemy at all: Catholic Ireland, Nationalist Ireland, desires not triumph over Ulster, they seek only friendship and goodwill.’ Casement appealed to the spirit of 1798, when Irish Catholics and Protestants had fought together for an independent Republic. Mrs. Alice Stopford Green spoke next. Daughter of the Church of Ireland Archdeacon of Meath and granddaughter of the Bishop of Meath, she declared that she was present for the honour of the Protestant faith. She reminded the largely Presbyterian audience that both Irish Presbyterians and Catholics had historically been discriminated against by an Anglican, aristocratic ascendancy, and that both had been bond together in the struggle for political and social rights. The future of all Irish Protestants and Catholics lay together, not apart. She touched her audience deeply when she made reference to the Land League: ‘the Protestant farmers of Ulster owe their present prosperity to the legislation obtained by Southern sacrifice’. Captain Jack White also spoke. White was the son of a British general and himself a soldier, but his experience in the Boer war would turn him into a strong opponent of British imperialism. White declared that their common Christian faith held each man to be a son of God. ‘But let Protestants remember this: the test of their sonship of God is their brotherhood with man, and those Protestants who think and act towards their Catholic fellow-countrymen as though they were their hereditary enemies had better, for their own sakes, leave the name Protestantism and God out of the question’. This declaration was met with cheering and prolonged applause. White proposed a counter covenant to that of Carson’s. The counter covenant read: “Being convinced in our conscience that Home Rule will not be disastrous to the national well-being of Ulster, and that, moreover, the responsibility of self-government would strengthen the popular forces in other provinces, would pave the way to a civil and religious freedom, which we do not now possess, and would give scope for a spirit of citizenship, we, in whose names are underwritten, Irish citizens, Protestants, and loyal supporters of Irish Nationality, relying under God on the proven good feelings and democratic instincts in our fellow-countrymen of other creeds, hereby pledge ourselves to stand by one another and our country in the troubled days that are before us and more especially to help one another when our liberties are threatened by any non-statutory body that may be set up in Ulster or elsewhere. We intend to abide by the just laws of the lawful Parliament of Ireland until such time as it may prove itself hostile to democracy. In sure confidence that God will stand by those who stand by the people, irrespective of class or creed, we hereunto subscribe our names.” After the meeting the Alternative Covenant was distributed and efforts were made to get a large number of Protestants in the county to sign. It is claimed that twelve thousand people signed the Alternative Covenant. Copies of the signatories were reported to be among Jack White's papers when he died. Unfortunately, White’s family, who did not share his views, made a bonfire of his papers immediately after his funeral. The speeches of the three main speakers were subsequently published in a pamphlet entitled ‘A Protestant Protest.’ After the Ballymoney meeting, a deputation went to meet the British Prime Minister Asquith on the 26th November 1913. The deputation was a mixture of businesspeople, trade unionists and academics, such as Professor Henry of Queens University Belfast, David Campbell of the Belfast Trade Council and Alex Wilson. The deputation emphasised to Asquith that those who were organising the Ulster Volunteer Force, an illegal militia established to resist Home Rule by force, were for the most part landlords, their tenants and their dependants. These paramilitaries did not speak for the Protestants of Ulster. Rev. JB Armour was quite vocal in dismissing Carson’s ‘Ulster Day’, the day of the signing of the Solemn League and Covenant, as ‘Protestant fool’s day’. He publicly denounced Carson, the Unionist leader, as ‘a sheer mountebank’ and ‘the greatest enemy of Protestantism’. He even wrote that Carson ought to be tarred and feathered! A public platform party against partition was formed. Its forty or so public representatives were distinguished Protestants, such as J. Goold-Verschoyle, Robert Carson, James Hanna, Rev JB Armour, WD. Hamilton and JL. Taggart. Also a member was Alec Wilson, the son of one of the directors of the great ship-building firms Harland and Wolff. Interestingly, Harland and Wolf expressed an indication at the time that they were opposed to partition and that they supported Home Rule. Unhappily, the Ballymoney meeting was a once-off and any activity that sprung from it failed to turn the tide of Carsonism. Carson and his followers in the Unionist Party and the UVF rose to popular power in Ulster in a wave of anti-catholic sentiment. The result was the British-imposed partition of Ireland. However, the Ballymoney meeting did show that a significant minority of Protestants in North-East Ulster were opposed to partition. At the Ballymoney meeting Roger Casement emphasised the links between ‘the Catholics of Wexford and the Presbyterians of Antrim who had fought together on the same side little more than a hundred years previously’. He said the ‘Protestant Dissenters of Ulster’ had played a very progressive role in Irish history, and what a wonderful contribution they could make to an all-Ireland state. He hoped that Catholics and Protestants would unite and that they would ‘set the Antrim hills ablaze’. Unfortunately, this was not to be.
  5. Excellent presentation and advice from Bev of the Clonakilty Favour Exchange at the Multicultural Market and Fair at Prussia Street in Dublin's Stoneybatter community today. Bev gave a presentation that lasted around 90-120 minutes followed by a considerable time of questions and round-table discussion. Looks like a group might form in the Stoneybatter area. A list of interested people in attendance was taken and a follow up meeting is taking place in a couple of weeks from today. If anyone else is interested I am sure they could email the ODS address to get added to the LETS\Time Bank specific list and receive confirmation of future events. I will try and confirm here as well if I know another meeting is taking place in Dublin or if there is another quality guest giving a talk.
  6. 1st sentence above - he was in the north of the Basque country at the time .
  7. Attaching some flyers for the event.
  8. Occupy Dame Street and the Dublin Multicultural Fair and Market would like to invite you to a public and free workshop on Local Exchange Trading Scheme (Lets) and Time banks We will have a presentation by Bev Cotton from the Clonakilty Favours Exchange. Bev will explain how the Timebank works and how to go about setting one up. Time: 4pm Sunday 2nd September 2012 Location: Dublin Multicultural Fair and Market, 27 Prussia St, D7 What is LETS A Local Exchange Trading Scheme (LETS) is a community-based system where goods and services are exchanged, not as one-to-one barter, but using a pooled system of credits and debits. To support this local currency is used which can only be spent within the group. A record of the transactions is kept by the group and the balances are published to members together with a listing of what is offered and what is wanted by the members. There are now several LETS schemes in Ireland, over 400 in the UK and thousands worldwide. A Timebank is a somewhat similar arrangement except that a Timebank is restricted to services.
  9. Adding some artwork and flyer content in support of the demo...