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Lugh Ildánach

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  1. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from Fodla32 in Communists Engaging in the Capitalist System   
    The following is a piece put together to try and formulate some guiding principles about how to engage with the capitalist system, particularly in the circumstances of a small group like our own which is so removed from state power.  Those few communist or socialist groups who do hold aspects of state power do, I believe, ultimately have the same issues/dillemmas when directing their economic sphere of influence, although the dynamics of the two situations are very different.
     
     
    Engaging in the capitalist system – Guiding Principles
     
    As Communists we are diametrically opposed to the commodifcation of labour. We therefore strive at all times to create, enhance and support projects which are based on labour which remains under the control and ownership of the proleteriat.
     
    With this aim in mind, we must however retain a strategic approach.
     
    As well as being under the control of workers, labour must be organised in a way that challenges the wider structures of capitalism. Without such organisation, small decommodified projects remain isolated, vulnerable to attack from the physical and economic forces of capital and are unable to fulfill their full revolutionary potential. Such smaller projects may however be useful at a local or limited level, for example in building communities of activists, or for creating physical, mental and spiritual space outside of capitalist domination.
     
    We also adopt a pragmatic approach. You cannot remove revolutionary principles from the daily struggle to improve the lives of the proletariat. Projects must be capable of enhancing the lives of those who are involved. Until such time as there exists a really existing communist economic alternative for the proletariat, projects will inevitably involve some degree of commodification. As so many spheres are dominated by commodification, in some cases the only immediate way to improve the lives of the proletariat is by obtaining money or other goods in which labour has been commodified.
     
    If we recognise this commodification, we can both be alert to the harmful effects that commodification has in order to avoid these wherever possible, and we can devise strategies to reduce and ultimately remove the dominance of commodification.
     
    This approach requires vigilance and discipline at all stages. We must be vigilant that the effects of commodification do not ultimately dictate our actions over and above our revolutionary communist principles. We must be disciplined to ensure that we do not indulge in the excesses of capitalism that present themselves, and also act fully in the knowledge that any immediate benefits that we obtain (as individuals and as a party) from engaging with commodification may at any time be removed should the revolution require this. Structures must be put in place to ensure that personal gain and profit are kept in check, and also at a Party level that there must be structures to ensure that the Party itself does not become corrupted by the capital that it tries to utilise. Moreover there needs to be a personal and party revolutionary discipline throughout, without which no structure is ever safe from the corrputing effects of capital.
     
    We must also recognise the nature of capital itself. Capital is the embodiment of labour stolen from its rightful owners. We should at all times be seeking to secure as much capital from the capitalist class. But what should we do with these spoils? These spoils are obtained at great personal sacrifice, of either the revolutionaries who put their lives and liberty on the line to attain it, or through the toil and humiliation of the process of commodification of labour.
     
    Only by the destruction of the system will those who rightfully own this labour be able to enjoy it fully. However, the everyday lives of those struggling must be improved by our struggle, and we must build a concrete example of our ideals in order to inspire and motivate people towards our cause. Captured capital must be deployed in these three ways in a way to build the revolution and to undermine and ultimately destroy the capitalist system. The deployment of this captured capital must at all times be strategic and carefully planned. However, it must also be recognised that this newly attained capital can assist in the capture of yet more capital, much in the same way that a guerrilla who has just captured some guns from the enemy may well use them to capture further and more advanced weapons.
     
    Capital is captured from the enemy in a number of ways. Various groups have concentrated on activities that have been proscribed by the capitalist rulers. These activities are often hard for the capitalist class to regulate and can often provide relative easy access to capital. These activities also often have negative social effects and can be used to criminalise political movements.
     
    However, the capitalist system is designed to facilitate the lawful accummulation of capital. Groups with more advanced and developed fund raising operations have quickly developed ways of turning the gains of their proscribed activities into lawful “investment”. Why would a revolutionary risk death or imprisonment through engagement in armed robberies, or why would one advance the destruction of communities by engaging with harmful drugs, when there are so many lawful ways of making money? True, lawful activities are taxed. However, the tax avoidance practices available under capitalism are surely much more effective than money laundering required to deal with unlawful gains.
     
    We do not condemn revolutionaries for engaging in proscribed activities, even ones which have an immediate harmful effect on individuals and their communities. If such activities are driven by a realistic long-term benefit to those communities, they can be justified. In the same way, engaging in commodification can be justified if it ultimately assists a wider struggle against commodication. The same principles apply when engaging in armed struggle, knowing that individuals and communities will suffer through that struggle. The legality within the capitalist system is irrelevant to us as revolutionaries, other than on a tactical basis. The difference between us and those others who deal in commodification, is that we do not accept that its legality gives it legitimacy. The legitimacy in our actions comes solely from our revolutionary intent and praxis, without which commodification of labour remains an affront to human dignity.
     
    We must be aware of every injury that our engagement with the current economic system causes. We do not participate in this injury lightly, but only after careful deliberation and in the convinced belief that progress towards the destruction of capitalism is not possible without it.
     
    In engaging with the system we must also use every opportunity to organise and educate a revolutionary proletariat. When and how this can be done will be different in each particular circumstances. Some projects will require clandestine economic operation which cannot be disclosed to the wider public at this time without jeopardising the revolutionary intent, whilst other projects will readily present themselves as material to be used in propaganda, and to act as rallying points for mass struggle. Where activities must be clandestine due to their nature, there must be extra vigilence and discipline to ensure that ulterior motives or personal gain do not obscure the revolutionary objective.
     
    To advance a revolutionary programme we must gain access to sufficient means of production. As communists we know more than anyone that under the current system hard work is never its own reward. The masses toil without reward.  As a class we have been dispossesed. To gain our rightful inheritance we must start to take it back. We must therefore engage in an economic and strategic war against this system, using all means at our disposal.  To do otherwise is to surrender all economic life to the enemy and to essentially restrict ourselves to activity that allows us to be criminalised.
     
     
    Summary
     
    Capture capital from the enemy by any means possible, and with the least risk possible to the revolutionaries
    Deploy that capital in the best way to undermine the political system and build the revolution, either by:
    using it to gain more capital from the enemy
    enhancing or alleviating the immediate living conditions life of the organised proletariat
    using it in strategically and tactically planned projects of decommodified labour
    using it in projects which undermine and destroy the capitalist system of domination
    In determining which way to deploy capital we must always be strategic, and weigh the negative effects of any required commodification against the tactical and strategic gains to be had.
    We must at all times have structures which guard against personal gain and political corruption
  2. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to Fodla32 in Ukraine Is US Trojan Horse ‘Gift’ To Russia   
    JOHN FOSTER looks at the machinations central to the US Project for a New American Century for clues about what the future might hold for Ukraine and beyond   On July 31 the lead editorial of the Financial Times called for a systematic strengthening of Nato ahead of its summit in Cardiff this September.    The alliance’s Article 5, its collective defence guarantee, needed to be given backbone and the alliance’s headquarters shifted to one of the “eastern countries” to give credibility to the alliance’s determination to intervene, if necessary, on Russia’s borders. The alliance’s Rapid Reaction Force should be systematically strengthened.    The FT is not usually a bellicose rabble-rouser. It is the paper that reflects the strategic thinking of the Anglo-US financial elite.    The editorial went on to talk of the need to overcome divisions within Nato — induced, it claimed, by the energy dependence of some countries on Russian oil and gas. It mentioned Italy but not Germany. It made no mention of Ukraine at all.   Yet Ukraine is, of course, where the story starts.   The US Secretary of State for Europe and Eurasia is Victoria Nuland. Previously Dick Cheney’s foreign policy adviser, she also happens to be married to Robert Kagan, the co-founder of the Project for a New American Century.   This project was the blueprint for the reconfiguration of world politics that was put together the year before George W Bush came to power and which inspired his interventions in the Middle East and central Asia.   On February 19, just five days before the February 24 coup in Kiev, the Wall Street Journal, house magazine for US neocons, carried an opinion piece quoting State Department sources.    It claimed that the successive defeats of US policy by the alliance of countries led by Russia, culminating in the failure of the US initiative for armed intervention in Syria, had finally stiffened resolve to take the offensive.   The opportunity now existed, so its sources argued, for exploiting a “policy asymmetry” in eastern Europe.    By intervening in Ukraine, the West could inflict a mortal blow on Russia’s plans for an economic union at little cost to itself.  Two weeks before, Nuland was recorded talking to the US ambassador in Kiev attacking Germany and the EU for compromising on Ukraine.    Her language was no doubt even stronger when EU leaders signed an agreement on February 21 with the then Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych for early elections and a de-escalation of protests.    Two days later, right-wing and fascist forces went on the rampage, invaded parliament and precipitated a coup immediately recognised as legitimate by the US.   This is the geopolitical background to the tragedy now unfolding in Ukraine — as well as to the divisions opening up in the ranks of the post-coup government in Kiev.    At the beginning of last week the UN commissioner for human rights estimated civilian deaths in the Donbas region at 1,129 and 3,442 wounded.    Since then fighting has intensified. CNN reports ballistic missiles being fired into Donetsk city. The French news agency AFP estimates that refugees are fleeing at over 2,000 a day. There are now 515,000 across the border in Russia and 4,000 in refugee camps.    And as the Kiev regime forces take territory, right-wing death squads move in. Over the past week, two elected local government leaders, both communists, have been abducted and murdered.    In Kiev itself the coup government passed a law on July 31 permitting the “preventive detention” of suspects without trial. It also imposed a “military tax” on all citizens and increased income tax to pay for its military campaign in the east.    At the same time splits are opening — splits that reflect the rancorous divisions in Ukraine’s oligarch-dominated politics and also those between Germany and the US.   The pro-EU Udar party and the ex-fascist Svoboda party pulled out of the Fatherland-dominated government last week — precipitating an election in the autumn.    The government is now solely run by the Fatherland party, which honours the nazi collaborator Stepan Bandera.    It would appear that these moves represent an attempt by the “chocolate king” President Petro Poroshenko to bolster his position against Fatherland.    An election is likely to lead to increased support for Udar, for Poroshenko’s own newly created party Solidarity and for Svodoba.    Back in 2006, Poroshenko, then a government minister, was blamed by the US for framing the pro-US Fatherland leader Yulia Tymoshenko on corruption charges.    Her imprisonment led eventually to the demise of the 2004 Orange Revolution. Leaked emails indicate the State Department had evidence of Poroshenko’s own corruption.    Today this gang of racists, bigots and thieves dominate what is left of the Kiev parliament, where only 240 of the original 450 deputies survive.    Last week they came together to dissolve the parliamentary representation of the Communist Party and to ask the courts to outlaw the party altogether.   The Communist Party gained 2.6 million votes in 2012, 14 per cent of the total. It is the only party that has stood out against oligarch-dominated politics, calling for a parliamentary republic and end to presidential power.    Long before the present crisis it called for federal autonomy to protect the rights of all linguistic minorities and for open democratic referendums on issues such as EU membership.    It stood out against privatisation, against fascism and for the protection of what remained of Ukraine’s now totally destroyed welfare state.    Despite the coup, it has steadfastly defended the territorial integrity of Ukraine, called for the protection of minority rights and for a peaceful resolution of differences. Now it is banned.   It is unclear how deep the divisions between the US and Germany are on the issue of Ukraine. In imposing sanctions after the MH17 crash, the EU made certain that its own fell most heavily on banking transactions through the City of London, mainly US banks, exempting French naval orders and German engineering.   Germany and its allies are far more dependent on Russian markets than the US — half their energy supply also comes from Russia.  Germany certainly wants Ukrainian markets and resources for the EU. But Germany and its allies need Russian markets and energy even more and don’t want the EU’s struggling economy saddled with the vast costs of a failed Ukraine.    The US, and its satellite Britain, on the other hand, want to move forward with their geopolitical plans and end Germany’s dependence on Russia.    As the FT says, the priority is to toughen up Nato’s eastern flank.   For us in Britain the tasks are clear. The left has to speak out far more unanimously against the war hysteria, urgently defend the Communist Party and other democrats in Ukraine and to expose the deadly dangers of an expansionist, aggressive Nato.    The Project for a New American Century has already caused untold suffering in the Middle East. We have to stop a repetition in eastern Europe.   http://www.morningst...-gift-to-Russia  
  3. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to Fodla32 in Óglach Alan Ryan Commemoration, Saturday, 6th September 2014   
    Oglach Alan Ryan commemoration
    Saturday, 6th September
    Assemble 3pm
    Grange Abbey Drive
    Donaghmede, Dublin
     
     
  4. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to Fodla32 in Mao Zedung: On Guerilla Warfare   
    Essential reading for all Communists:
     
    http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/mao/works/1937/guerrilla-warfare/
  5. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from Fodla32 in Students offered scholarships for pro-Israel posts on social media   
    Anyone frequenting the online world knows surely that this is happening already, there are vehement and very well resourced Zionist apologists on any political forum I have been on.
  6. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from Fodla32 in France bans pro-Palestinian rallies   
    http://m.france24.com/en/20140719-live-pro-palestine-protesters-gather-paris-desite-police-ban/
  7. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from Fodla32 in France bans pro-Palestinian rallies   
    I'm sure there will be even worse riots over the banning!
  8. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to Fodla32 in Statement from CIRA Prisoners, Roe 3, Maghaberry Jail, Co Antrim.   
    RSF news - Republican Sinn Fein - http://rsf.ie Statement from CIRA Prisoners, Roe 3, Maghaberry Jail, Co Antrim. 
    As Republican prisoners we abide by a strict etiquette of honour, honesty and discipline. At all times we have honoured our word and have given the prison regime room to implement their side of any agreement we reached with them.
    To date the prison regime have not implemented the agreed end to controlled movement amongst other things agreed upon, thus proving they are not to be trusted and their modus operandi is the criminalisation of Republican prisoners.   The latest attempt to criminalise Republican prisoners concerns visiting arrangements. At present POWs can sit in a “booth” beside their families, hold their children and maintain strong family relationships. The prison regime is working now on changing the outlay and number of tables available for a visit.   They plan to have a metal round table, with one seat for prisoners and three seats at the other side of the table for visitors, this will be completely open plan. The seat for prisoners will even go as far as being a different colour, no longer will families be able to sit together, privacy will be completely removed and replaced with a sterile and clinical atmosphere resulting in a formal style visit of prisoners with their families and friends.   Many prisoners have children and this will seriously impact on the quality time they can spend with them and could lead to an estrangement, having to visit their fathers in such an alien, unnatural and restrictive environment.   We, as Republican prisoners will not be criminalised and so cannot, and will not, accept this arrangement. We will refuse all visits that are conducted in this manner, as we will not allow the prison regime to humiliate us or our families. We would point to the will of Republican prisoners in the past who previously asserted their rights as political prisoners not to be criminalized; like those before us we are prepared and we will not capitulate or be forced into an unacceptable regime at the prison.   The proposal stops short of imposing a partition between prisoners and visitors. We believe this is only the start of phasing in a complete criminalisation policy against Republicans. We will not be found wanting in our resistance and we urge the public to get behind us in this campaign. The work has already begun on changing the visiting room, this policy could be implemented in the next couple of weeks and so we urgently need support and the Republican people to highlight this for us.   Signed: O/C, CIRA POWs
    Maghaberry Gaol
    July 12, 2014
  9. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted in Quotes   
    "Only in the Roman Empire and in Spain under Arab domination has culture been a potent factor. Under the Arab, the standard attained was wholly admirable; to Spain flocked the greatest scientists, thinkers, astronomers, and mathematicians of the world, and side by side there flourished a spirit of sweet human tolerance and a sense of purist chivalry. Then with the advent of Christianity, came the barbarians. Had Charles Martel not been victorious at Poitiers—already you see the world had already fallen into the hands of the Jews, so gutless a thing Christianity!—then we should in all probability have been converted to Mohammedanism, that cult which glorifies heroism and which opens up the seventh Heaven to the bold warrior alone. Then the Germanic races would have conquered the world. Christianity alone prevented them from doing so."
     
    -Adolf Hitler 28 August 1942
  10. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to Fodla32 in Bertell Ollman: Marx's Vision of Communism   
    An excellent overview, spanning many documents, outlining Marx's views of a future Communist society, from the first stage of the Dictatorship of the Proletratiat, where many aspects of the old regime will still exist, to the completely new form of society found in full Communism.
     
    http://www.nyu.edu/projects/ollman/docs/vision_of_communism.php#8
     
  11. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted in Indian factory workers beat CEO to death   
    A mob of Indian workers has beaten the CEO of a jute factory to death in a dispute over increasing their working hours, police told the AP news agency after arresting six workers.
     
    Four suspects were arrested on Sunday, followed by two on Monday, and are expected to be charged with murder, vandalism and other crimes.
     
    A group of 200 workers, wielding iron rods and stones, stormed the office of 60-year-old HK Maheswari in the eastern Indian state of West Bengal, according to Sunil Chowdhury, the Hooghly district superintendent.
     
    Maheswari had denied their earlier request to work and be paid for 40 hours a week at the North Brook Jute Mill, instead of the current norm of 25.
     
    He had also proposed shutting down the mill for three days a week to limit mounting financial losses, according to the factory's general manager, Kiranjit Singh.

      "The mill workers suddenly resorted to stone pelting while we were busy in a meeting," Kiranjit Singh told AP.
     
    At one point during Sunday's meeting, Maheswari looked out the window at the growing crowd and was struck in the head by two stones.
     
    He collapsed, at which point a large group of workers stormed the office, Singh said.
    "The CEO was thrashed with iron rods, and he succumbed to his injuries very soon," Singh said.
    Both the general manager and a security guard were treated at hospital, while Maheswari died on the way to a hospital, police said.
     
    West Bengal is known for its combative labour unions backed by political parties, and chief minister Mamata Banerjee immediately blamed the violence on unions run by opposition parties.
    The opposition has denied any role in the attack, and said an independent investigation should be held before any blame is hurled.
     
    On Monday, Banerjee sought to reassure the business community that her government did not tolerate union violence.
     
    http://www.aljazeera.com/news/asia/2014/06/indian-factory-works-beat-ceo-death-201461613500329188.html
     
     
     
  12. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to Fodla32 in An Essay on The Revised Bretton Woods System   
    Well, it's written in 2003, and that was a different world in many ways. I think the writers of this article certainly wouldn't look forward to the end of Capitalism.  I really posted it as a good analysis of the way that the USA uses it's imperial might - military and economic - to force everyone else to pay its bills.  Certainly, as long as other countries do that, the USA is quite secure. But, will countries like Britain and Germany allow themselves to be reduced to Greek levels of poverty and debt?  I doubt it.
  13. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from Fodla32 in Vatican statement on the use of aborted babies to manufacture vaccines   
    Their conclusions appear very reasonable, I would like to see the same rational thought applied to abortion itself rather than the absolutism that we see from the church and so many other quarters
     
    "To summarize, it must be confirmed that:
     
    there is a grave responsibility to use alternative vaccines and to make a conscientious objection with regard to those which have moral problems;
     
    as regards the vaccines without an alternative, the need to contest so that others may be prepared must be reaffirmed, as should be the lawfulness of using the former in the meantime insomuch as is necessary in order to avoid a serious risk not only for one's own children but also, and perhaps more specifically, for the health conditions of the population as a whole - especially for pregnant women;
     
    the lawfulness of the use of these vaccines should not be misinterpreted as a declaration of the lawfulness of their production, marketing and use, but is to be understood as being a passive material cooperation and, in its mildest and remotest sense, also active, morally justified as an extrema ratio due to the necessity to provide for the good of one's children and of the people who come in contact with the children (pregnant women);
     
    such cooperation occurs in a context of moral coercion of the conscience of parents, who are forced to choose to act against their conscience or otherwise, to put the health of their children and of the population as a whole at risk. This is an unjust alternative choice, which must be eliminated as soon as possible.
  14. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from Fodla32 in An Essay on The Revised Bretton Woods System   
    I only read the extract, but is this article essentially saying that capitalism is going to be able to sustain itself into the foreseeable future?
     
    Not good if we are hoping for a rise in class consciousness in the rich countries
  15. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted in Anti-homeless spikes installed in posh London neighborhood spark outrage   
    After photos of metal spikes designed to prevent homeless people from sleeping in posh London neighborhoods surfaced online, people have been venting their outrage with controversial invention all over the social media.
     
    Photographs of metal studs on the doorsteps of a luxury flat building on Southwark Bridge Road in central London spurred an “anti-homeless spikes” hashtag campaign by Ethical Pioneer Twitter page.
     
    An anonymous resident of the residential complex told the Telegraph, that “there was a homeless man asleep there about six weeks ago. ‘Then about two weeks ago all of a sudden studs were put up outside. I presume it is to deter homeless people from sleeping there.”
     
    However, London resident Nathan FitzPatrick tweeted after talking to locals outside the building that only one person could confirm homeless were sleeping there – and that was a woman and a child.
     
    Some social media users however were justifying the actions, claiming that nobody likes homeless people and beggars hanging around and saying that such spikes and similar anti-homeless constructions are pretty common occurrence not only London but in many other European countries as well.
     
    http://rt.com/news/164524-spikes-homeless-london-outrage/
     

     
     
    I can''t understand how anyone could do this, I really can't. It's so cruel that it almost seems surreal
  16. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from John in So was Gerry Adams right after all?   
    Despite their flaws, you do have to admire their pragmatism and discipline. They know what is possible and what is not. A strong leadership that is able to bring its base round to positions that they would never have thought possible.
     
    If the real left had these traits, they would be a force to reckon with.
  17. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from Fodla32 in So was Gerry Adams right after all?   
    People were saying the same when Fianna Fáil entered the fray. A populist party, with republican sympathy, but without any strong ideological base their populism was easily hijacked by the governing classes.
     
    Granted, there is definitely a more leftist slant to the psf rhetoric in the south, but just look at their position in the north where they actually are in government and you see a party as cosy with the business class as any gombeen.
     
    In 2/3 election cycles we will have the likes of Mairtín O'Millions representing psf in Dublin too!
     
    But before that happens there will be a party elected in the free state on a left wing platform. What they do with that position will define the next 50 years of Irish politics. And just as important is the response of the revolutionary left. If there hasn't been a revolutionary alternative built up by that stage, then the classless and apolitical populism of Sinn Fein will have no challengers and the gombeens will rise through the ranks of the new pretenders.
     
    None of this unfortunately brings a united ireland any closer as this will only happen once a different class takes power.
  18. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to Fodla32 in More Fine Gael Corruption - Denis O'Brien awarded 20 million euro contract to supply government with fuel   
    Denis O'Brien owes his millions to the corruption of Fine Gael minister Michael Lowery, who awarded O'Brien the first private mobile license in the free state, for a reported under the counter payment of €100,000.  Even though O'Brien had no background in telecommunications. O'Brien then sold on the license to British Telecom for 250 million euro.  What a great businessman and entrepreneur!!!  Makes Al Capone look shoddy.  
     
    But, now Denis is at it again.  He has been using his media monopoly in Ireland to support Fine Gael (without much effect it has to be said), but one good turn deserves another, and O'Brien's oil company, Topaz, has been awarded a nice fat contract to supply fuel to the government (though you'd nearly think they could buy it on the international market themselves at wholesale prices - though, if they did that, how could they reward their gombeen supporters?)
     
    http://www.businessworld.ie/livenews.htm?a=3164247
     
  19. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from John in So was Gerry Adams right after all?   
    Despite their flaws, you do have to admire their pragmatism and discipline. They know what is possible and what is not. A strong leadership that is able to bring its base round to positions that they would never have thought possible.
     
    If the real left had these traits, they would be a force to reckon with.
  20. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to Fodla32 in So was Gerry Adams right after all?   
    FF was actually a much more radical party in the 1930s than PSF is now.  The cleared the slums and built tens of thousands of new homes for the working class. And there was much less money available in the 1930s than now. PSF would be afraid to do that now, as it might lower the property values for their new found middle class supporters.
  21. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from Fodla32 in So was Gerry Adams right after all?   
    People were saying the same when Fianna Fáil entered the fray. A populist party, with republican sympathy, but without any strong ideological base their populism was easily hijacked by the governing classes.
     
    Granted, there is definitely a more leftist slant to the psf rhetoric in the south, but just look at their position in the north where they actually are in government and you see a party as cosy with the business class as any gombeen.
     
    In 2/3 election cycles we will have the likes of Mairtín O'Millions representing psf in Dublin too!
     
    But before that happens there will be a party elected in the free state on a left wing platform. What they do with that position will define the next 50 years of Irish politics. And just as important is the response of the revolutionary left. If there hasn't been a revolutionary alternative built up by that stage, then the classless and apolitical populism of Sinn Fein will have no challengers and the gombeens will rise through the ranks of the new pretenders.
     
    None of this unfortunately brings a united ireland any closer as this will only happen once a different class takes power.
  22. Like
  23. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to Fodla32 in Palestinians anticipate support for statehood from Pope Francis' visit   
    I think Al Gaddafi was right that the only solution is a single secular state, for both Jews and Muslims. We have seen in Ireland that setting up two sectarian states is a recipe for disaster.
  24. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from Fodla32 in African Internationalist perspective on Boko Haram & Nigeria   
    Another great podcast from Africa Live with spot-on anti-imperialist socialist global analysis http://uhurunews.com/radio/playaudio?resource_name=this-moment-in-history-live-featuring-african-socialist-international-chairman-omali-yeshitela
     
  25. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted in IDF Sniper murders two Palestinian Children   
    Israeli terrorists claiming "self defense" shot a boy through the heart as he walked peacefully down the street, moments before killing another boy doing nothing.

    Originally the IDF claimed the boy was killed in self-defense, but CCTV footage has emerged showing him doing nothing out of the ordinary before suddenly being shot in the heart
     
    http://www.theguardian.com/world/video/2014/may/20/cctv-footage-palestinian-teenagers-shot-dead-video
     
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