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Lugh Ildánach

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  1. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from nico in Today's Irish Republicans and Marx's "The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte."   
    I would fundamentally disagree with you on this point. We need to recognise that these things, fair remuneration for work, free education etc., are not possible under capitalism. We need to look at the reasons why we are paid a fraction of the value of our labour, why we do not have free health care or education, unless you look at the causes, you can't hope to change it. Demanding these changes, without demanding a change of the system that causes them is meaningless.
  2. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from nico in Comhrá Leanúnach - Ongoing Chat for Learners   
    Dia daoibh a chairde! Tá mé ag foglaim an teanga freisin!!!
  3. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to nico in Lost Youth – Songs of Solidarity   
    http://youtu.be/t02Ojd8FnOo

     




  4. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to nico in Lost Youth – Songs of Solidarity   
    Some of the songs included on the track:
     




     




  5. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to nico in Lost Youth – Songs of Solidarity   
    ‘Lost Youth – Songs of Solidarity’ is a benefit CD for a young Palestinian theatre performer imprisoned since 2005. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this collection will also go towards highlighting the child prisoner issue.
    Buy the CD or Download – CLICK HERE





     
    In 2005 A’edoon, a Palestinian youth theatre group from Balata Refugee Camp in the West Bank, visited Ireland, Scotland and England to perform ‘dabke’ dance and drama at local festivals. Organisers had seen the trip as a chance to demonstrate to a foreign audience the richness and vibrancy of Palestinian culture. It was also an opportunity to take a large group of young people away from the dangers and stresses of a life enclosed by occupation and conflict.



    As the group crossed between the West Bank and Jordan, a 15-year-old performer was taken away by soldiers. Mohammed was kept in interrogation for over two months and ultimately sentenced by a military court on spurious charges. He is due for release in 2012.


     
     


    Back Cover - Click to enlarge and see tracklisting


     
    Rich, passionate and absorbing, the album contains an eclectic mix of songs and tunes from a variety of genres. Traditional Irish and Basque tracks nestle comfortably between thought-provoking political folk and Palestinian hip-hop contributions.
    For more information contact lostyouth2011 [at] live.ie
    Follow us on Facebook.
  6. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to Frithbheart32 in Another privatised bin service increases charges in Dublin   
    This is causing murder in working class Dublin, again another tax on money they dont have.
     
    And the council workers were told either move to another department within council which they know is unfeasible or go capital driven private company with your pension severed, much lower pay, and no assurances like what state provided.
     
    They know damn well the only people that will assume this role is Poor desperate migrant workers who serve as expendible drones
  7. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from nico in Comhrá Leanúnach - Ongoing Chat for Learners   
    Dia daoibh a chairde! Tá mé ag foglaim an teanga freisin!!!
  8. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from nico in Today's Irish Republicans and Marx's "The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte."   
    But the point is that the system is what causes all of these things that you complain of. If you don't want to change the system, then what do you want to change? You want to make it fairer? That's impossible, capitalism is not fair, and cannot be fair.
     
    Its not armed revolution or nothing though. There are ways of surviving the system (having a job etc.) and also planning on how to bring about real social change. And I don't believe that it requires men of any more stature than the average working person, if it did, then it wouldn't be a democratic revolution.
  9. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from nico in Today's Irish Republicans and Marx's "The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte."   
    I would fundamentally disagree with you on this point. We need to recognise that these things, fair remuneration for work, free education etc., are not possible under capitalism. We need to look at the reasons why we are paid a fraction of the value of our labour, why we do not have free health care or education, unless you look at the causes, you can't hope to change it. Demanding these changes, without demanding a change of the system that causes them is meaningless.
  10. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from Laoch na nGael in Charity - Good or Bad?   
    I don't think we should ban them (as if we could!!!). We need to offer a better service, one based on solidarity rather than charity. When we do this, then people can see the deficiencies of charity. Its like anything, until we do this ourselves, we're in no real position to criticise those who are doing it!
  11. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from nico in Marxists Internet Archive   
    I didn't appreciate that their strike is part of a wider protest today, including Wikipedia. It might get some sort of point through to them.
  12. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from nico in Marxists Internet Archive   
    I'm not sure their strike will have any affect on congress, but hey, ONE OUT - ALL OUT!!!! And I'll not be crossing their picket line by visiting their site today :hammersickle: :hammersickle:
  13. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to Fodla32 in The Ethnic Cleansing of a Libyan Town By Racist Nato Rats   
    'Cleansed' Libyan town spills its terrible secrets
     
    By Tarik Kafala BBC News, Libya

     
     
    The 30,000 people living in a town in northern Libya have been driven out of their homes, in what appears to have been an act of revenge for their role in the three-month siege of the city of Misrata. So what really happened in the town of Tawergha, are the accusations of brutality against the town's residents fair and what does it say about hopes for national unity?
    "No, they can never come back… They have done us too much harm, terrible things. We cannot forgive them."
     
    Najia Waks, a young woman from Libya's third largest city, Misrata, is talking about the people of Tawergha, a town about 50km (30 miles) to the south.
     
    For three months between early March and the middle of May, the forces of Muammar Gaddafi laid siege to Misrata. These forces were partly based in Tawergha, and the people of the town are accused of being complicit in the attempt to put down the uprising in the city. They are also accused of crimes including murder, rape and sexual torture.
     

     
    Tawerghans are scattered across Libya in camps
     
    The fighters of Misrata eventually prevailed, breaking out of their battered city, and Misratan brigades made up part of the force that overran the capital Tripoli in August. They also captured and killed Gaddafi and one of his sons in late October, and put the corpses on display in their city.
    In the middle of August, between the end of the siege and the killing of Gaddafi, Misratan forces drove out everyone living in Tawergha, a town of 30,000 people. Human rights groups have described this as an act of revenge and collective punishment possibly amounting to a crime against humanity.
     
    Tawerghans are mostly descendants of black slaves. They are generally poor, were patronised by the Gaddafi regime and were broadly supporters of his regime. Some signed up to fight for him as the regime fought for its survival.
  14. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from Fodla32 in Open Discussion on Cúrsaí Spioradálta, Spiritual Matters   
    I don't think all communists/socialists have thrown the baby out with the bath water. I know a great many socialists who would describe themselves as spiritual people.
     
    And while I do have time for aspects of many of the major religions, they have all essentially arisen as props to the economic mode of production, ie capitalism. Religions emerge as a result of human experience, they reflect human life, and are influenced by the structures of power that exist at the time. Of course there will be something that we can identify with within these religions, given the common human experience, and indeed the ideas that have arisen in religions do need to be explored in our own context to see what value they can bring to ourselves.
     
    But ultimately, all organised religions have an agenda of power. We should not give them any more power by feeding their whatever apparent legitimacy they have left.
     
    I have, for my sins (pun intended!), been at quite a few Masses over the past number of weeks and months, probably more times than I have been to Mass in my entire life up to now. At every one of them I have been able to get something positive from it, interpretting the selective quotes from certain selected books with my own slant. I almost enjoyed the experience! But that doesn't change the fact that the whole process is co-ordinated by an organisation whose interests are entirely contrary to my own.
     
    If as revolutionary socialists we want to maintain our spirituality, and maintain our ownership of our religious beliefs, then we need to take control of the structures that spread or facilitate those beliefs. The Church, or any of the other organised religions are beyond reform, they cannot be taken over from within any more than the State system can be reformed from within. I do not believe that active participation in status quo religious institutions is compatible with revolutionary socialism any more than I believe that active participation in representational democracy is compatible.
     
    Essentially we need to start our own church. The word church even has too many negative conotations, I should rather say, that we need to initiate our own structures to reflect our own spirituality and encourage our spiritual development.
     
    Currently we can probably be divided into two camps, those who have abandonned religion, and those who keep one foot within religion while trying to reconcile what essentially is irreconcilable. For those in the former camp, I think the above post by Fodla is aimed at them, and I agree that they should not abandon spirituality, or indeed some of the important tenets of the major religions. For those in the latter camp, they need to recognise that by attending church and taking advices from organised hierarchy, that they are surrendering responsibility of their spirtual selves. They need to take back that responsibility and abandon organised religion.
     
    Of course, like anything else, we cannot simply call for people to abandon religion while we have no alternative to offer them. That would be life asking them to immediately abandon money or wage slavery without providing an alternative for them to feed themselves. People need to satisfy their spiritual needs, and socialism has not yet grappled with this fundamental human need. Until we do so, and until we can provide an alternative to Church, people will be forced to get their spiritual fix from our enemies!
  15. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to Fodla32 in MEDIA DISINFO: British journalist: Image of events on the ground in Syria is completely contrary to media depictions   
    The British journalist Lizzie Phelan said the image of events on ground in Syria is completely contrary to what some media try to depict and present to the public opinion.
     
    Phelan, who is now on a visit to Syria, said that she was surprised upon her arrival in Damascus as a journalist 6 days ago to see the situation as it is, as she had thought, based on the image presented by media, that Syria is not safe where chaos is prevailing, the army deployed in the streets and the anti-government protests are being held daily and everywhere.
     
    She stressed in an interview with the Syrian TV that what she has seen during her visit is that life is normal and that people go to their businesses and schools in spite of some problems.
     
    She asserted that the city of Damascus is very safe as she has been moving in it alone in the late hours of the night and has not been faced with any problem or seen any big anti-government protests.
     
    Phelan pointed out that she saw the huge pro-government rally in the Umayyad Square and was surprised with the reality of the situation in Syria, which she said is completely different from what is being conveyed to the West, the US and other countries.
     
    The British journalist considered that President Bashar al-Assad's coming out to the Umayyad Square and his direct talk to the people was "very interesting" for her since the media such as the BBC and al-Jazeera TV channels claim that the Syrian people are not with President al-Assad, noting that the tens of thousands of people who gathered in the Square were very glad to see him and expressed their love and support for him.
     
    http://globalresearc...xt=va&aid=28681
  16. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to TomBarry1921 in Republican POW denied release to attend father's funeral‏   
    The POW Department, Republican Sinn Féin, said in a statement on January 18 that the decision of the Stormont Justice Department to deny a Republican prisoner compassionate parole to attend his father’s funeral exposed the inhumanity of the British Prison service when dealing with Republican prisoners.
     
    Spokesperson Josephine Hayden continued: “Damien McKenna of Lurgan applied for compassionate parole to attend his father’s funeral in Lurgan on January 19 and was refused on the grounds that he is a protesting prisoner. Damien, along with his comrades in Maghaberry prison, is engaged in a protest against strip-searching and in defence of the historic right of Republican prisoners to political status.
     
    “Once more the real face of British rule in Ireland shows itself. Britain and their hirelings have learned nothing over the course of centuries of occupation. Thirty-one years after the brutality of the H-Blocks and the hunger strikes of 1981 yet another group of Irish Republican prisoners are being brutalised by a prison system designed to break the spirit of resistance. Irish history teaches us it will have the opposite effect and will instead galvanise the spirits of the POWs in their struggle for a free Ireland.
     

    “Our thoughts and sympathies are with Damien McKenna and his family in their sad loss.”


     
     

    Críoch/Ends


     
    https://lists.riseup.net/www/info/rsfnews
  17. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to Fodla32 in Bill Hicks: Sane Man (1989) [FULL]   
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4SNtuagX1rk
  18. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from Fodla32 in Republican POW denied release to attend father's funeral‏   
    That's low! Are there any protests organised against this? I'd say people would sympathise with this even if they weren't Republicans.
  19. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to Fodla32 in Nato Rat NTC refusing to give ICC information on health of Saif al-Islam   
    ICC deadline looms for news on Saif Gaddafi
     
     
    10/01/12 1,402 Views 1 CommentShare Tweet2
     

     
    THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT says that the new Libyan government has so far failed to provide information on the health and status of Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, the captured son of former leader Muammar Gaddafi.
     
    The ICC, which has indicted Saif Gaddafi for crimes against humanity, gave Libya’s National Transitional Council (NTC) a deadline to share the information on the prisoner – however that time elapses today. The court earlier issued a further request for information but if it receives no response it may refer Libya to the UN Security Council, reports the BBC.
     
    The ICC says it accepts the wishes of Libyan leaders to try Saif Gaddafi in the country, but seeks assurances that he will receive a fair trial.
     
    The failure of the NCT to either charge or provide access to a lawyer to Saif Gaddafi, who has been held in a makeshift prison cell since being arrested by militias in November, has prompted criticisms from human rights groups.
     
    The Guardian reports that more than 7,000 prisoners of war remain in prisons across Libya without access to legal representation or fair trial.
  20. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to Fodla32 in Magnus Betner @ Comedy Café London   
  21. Like
  22. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted to nico in Marxists Internet Archive   
  23. Like
    Lugh Ildánach reacted in Any ideas for the forum?   
    it looks fantastic comrades well done! finally a good alternative forum for republicans
  24. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from seanogmg in Dublin City Plan to Charge 500 euro for Firebrigade Callout   
    It would be ironic if people angry at these changes set a councillor's car on fire, and the councillor then had to pay to have it extinguished
  25. Like
    Lugh Ildánach got a reaction from seanogmg in Dublin City Plan to Charge 500 euro for Firebrigade Callout   
    It would be ironic if people angry at these changes set a councillor's car on fire, and the councillor then had to pay to have it extinguished
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